How to Survive as a Firefly

September 11, 2017

How to Survive as a Firefly
by Kristen Foote
Illustrated by Erica Salcedo

Image result for how to survive as a firefly

Did you know that fireflies only live as adults for 5-30 days?

Drill Sergeant Firefly is tasked with teaching the firefly larvae all they need to know to survive their life cycle.  And he must accomplish this task quickly, before he dies.

Told in a comical dialogue, readers learn about metamorphosis, the firefly life cycle, bioluminescence, and everything you could possibly want to know about fireflies!

Looking for a way to spice up your how tos?

Looking for a possible project using coding, incorporating life cycles?

Looking for a mentor text that shows a comical voice?

Just looking for a good read?

This is the book for you!

 

Online Resources:

http://beckycastlethebarefootteacher.blogspot.com/2017/08/free-how-to-survive-as-firefly-life.html

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/How-to-Survive-as-a-Firefly-Response-Journal-3321295

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/How-to-Survive-as-a-Firefly-Book-Companion-Activities-3367275

 

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Finding Winnie

March 14, 2016

by Lindsey Mattick
Winner of the 2016 Caldecott Medal

Finding Winnie is the true story of how Winnie the Pooh came to be.

Book Blurb from the catalog: A woman tells her young son the true story of how his great-great-grandfather, Captain Harry Colebourn, rescued and learned to love a bear cub in 1914 as he was on his way to take care of soldiers’ horses during World War I, and the bear became the inspiration for A.A. Milne’s Winnie-the-Pooh.

This story would be great to:

  • Teach suspenseful endings (Cole is not happy with how his mother leaves the story of Winnie.  Cole’s mother then starts another story to further explain Winnie in a different way.)
  • Family Trees
  • Sequencing
  • Beginning, Middle, End (though there are two stories in this one book, so be careful)
  • Dialogue
  • Caldecott (excellent illustrations)

 


Impact: The Story of the September 11 Terrorist Attacks

February 24, 2016

Impact: The Story of the September 11 Terrorist Attacks

Most appropriate for 4th grade and up, this narrative nonfiction book tells about the terror of September 11, 2001 from multiple perspectives. Chapters unfold as the reader meets a passenger on Flight 93 (the plane that crashed in Pennsylvania), an air traffic controller at Washington D.C.’s Dulles airport, a worker in the south tower of the World Trade Center, a worker who happened to be in the elevator of the north tower of the World Trade Center, NYPD firefighters responding to the call for help, the medial relations person from the Pentagon, and a Fox News reporter.  All of their stories weave together to describe the heartbreak that happened on September 11.

This book is a great resource for lessons about generating questions related to text.  Students often have many questions about what happened that day; this book could be the catalyst to teach a reading comprehension strategy while teaching about the emotions and events from September 11, 2001.

According to Capstone, this book is perfect for Common Core standards about narrative nonfiction and exploring multiple accounts of an event.

Resources to use in follow up lessons:

Follow up your learning about September 11 with the poetry book September 12th or the narrative nonfiction picture book 14 Cows for America.

Cover imageDescription of September 12th: Conveys the sense of hope and comfort found in the routine of everyday activities following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001

Cover imageDescription of 14 Cows for America: Presents an illustrated tale of a gift of fourteen cows given by the Maasai people of Kenya to the U.S. as a gesture of comfort and friendship in the wake of the attacks of September 11, 2001.


Capstone Press: A Primary Source History Series

February 23, 2016

Primary Source History

Capstone Publishing has an excellent new nonfiction series showing how researchers incorporate primary sources into their writing.

Quoted on the Table of Contents of each book: “Primary sources are newspaper articles, photographs, speeches, or other documents that were created during an event.  They are great ways to see how people spoke and felt during that time.  You’ll find primary sources…throughout this book.  Within the text [of the book], primary source quotations are colored red and set in italic type.”

With instruction, students begin to see how nonfiction authors incorporate primary sources into their writing.  Lessons can surround how the primary sources add to the understanding of new information and feel of nonfiction writing.

Primary Source History books in the Lowell library:

  • Slavery in the United States
  • Dust Bowl
  • Westward Expansion
  • U.S. Independence
  • Gold Rush
  • American Revolution
  • War of 1812
  • U.S.  Civil War

These topics touch fourth and fifth grade social studies standards.
Meets the Common Core State Standards for analyzing multiple accounts of an event.